03 9, 2021

Power to the Pens during our Journaling Night for Teens & Tweens

By |2021-03-09T09:00:31-05:00March 9, 2021|

paper-3033204_640We’re hosting a special Journal Night for teens and tweens at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 23.

Young writers can unwind and find an outlet for their creativity during our program. We’ll provide writing prompts and a supportive atmosphere where thoughts and ink may flow freely.

Journal Night is open to all teens and tweens (ages 11 to 18.) The program will be hosted via Zoom, and you have to register to get the link. You can sign up on our website or by calling us at (440) 255-8811 ext. 247. Once registered, teens and tweens can pick up a special writing kit from the our Main Branch. It includes a notebook, pen and stickers to help you get started.

The library also offers a lot more resources for writers:

  1. Lynda.com offers video tutorials from pros on all different kinds of writing: fiction, screenwriting, even business writing. And the tutorials are free to watch with your library card.
  2. Learn from the experts of The Great Courses! Some of the best college professors in the world offer tips on writing great essays and fiction! Great Courses can get expensive to buy, but many are free to stream with your library card and our digital services.
  3. You probably already know this, but we also have hundreds of books and videos on writing that you can borrow from our collection.
  4. Finally, you may enjoy suggestions from professional authors. We’ve interviewed dozens of writers who’ve visited our library. See what advice they share on our YouTube channel.
03 1, 2019

2019 Northcoast Writers’ Showcase features load of local talent & ‘Dreamers’ author Imbolo Mbue

By |2019-03-01T06:00:07-05:00March 1, 2019|

Imbolo Mbue

Imbolo Mbue

Imbolo Mbue, author of the critically acclaimed Behold the Dreamers, will be the keynote speaker for the second Northcoast Writers’ Showcase from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at Lakeland Community College.

Mbue’s keynote will cap a day in which readers and aspiring writers can interact with dozens of talented and hard-working authors, ask questions about their writing journey, and attend workshops about the craft of writing.

The showcase begins at 11 a.m. in Lakeland’s H-Building. Authors will have their books available for sale and signing throughout the event. And breakout sessions will be held during the afternoon, as well.

Breakout leaders and topics:

Noon

1 PM

2 PM

3 PM

  • Imbolo Mbue‘s keynote talk in the Dr. Wayne L. Rodehorst Performing Arts Center with book signing to follow

Other participating authors and publishers include:

Both the Showcase and Mbue’s keynote address are free to attend and open to all. People can register for Mbue’s talk at www.leagueoflibraries.org.

The Northcoast Writers’ Showcase is hosted by the Lake-Geauga League of Libraries, a group of 12 libraries in Lake and Geauga County that have partnered to promote the arts, creativity and enthusiasm for learning in the region.

The Lake-Geauga League of Libraries includes Burton, Fairport Harbor, Geauga County, Kirtland, Lake Erie College, Lakeland Community College, Madison, Mentor, Morley, Perry, Wickliffe and Willoughby-Eastlake library systems.

The showcase is funded by the collective generosity of the library’s foundations, friends groups, The Lubrizol Corporation and Lake County Visitors Bureau.

Northcoast Writers Showcase Ledger 2019

11 16, 2016

9 Writing Tips from Author Tricia Springstubb

By |2016-11-16T06:00:50-05:00November 16, 2016|

Tricia Springstubb offers advice to new authors during the National Novel Writing Month kickoff at Mentor Public Library

Tricia Springstubb offers advice to new authors during the National Novel Writing Month kickoff at Mentor Public Library

Author Tricia Springstubb visited our library last week to help us launch National Novel Writing Month.

Springstubb has written “Moonpenny Island” and other popular books for young readers, as well as award-winning short fiction for adults.

She offered strategies (and coping techniques) for writing 50,000 words in 30 days. (That’s an approximate word goal. The aim of National Novel Writing Month is to complete a draft of your novel in one month.)

Here are nine pieces of advice she offered our fledgling authors:

1. There’s no such thing as a perfect first draft

“You’re not going to write a book in one month. Very few people can do that. But you can write a draft. It might be a bad draft, but it’s a place to start … I never write just two drafts. I write three or four. I’ve never written a novel in less than a year. Some take me three or four years.

2. Have a pattern

“Especially with novel writing, consistency is important. I sit in a certain place at a certain time and I write. I write six days a week.

3. Appreciate the value of what you’re doing

“You are making something new. You’re not tearing anyone down. That’s beautiful. It’s good for the world and it’s good for you.”

4. When you get writer’s block, think about your characters

“When people say, ‘I don’t know what happens next,’ they’re usually saying, ‘I just don’t know my character well enough.’

“Start listing traits, things that may never make the novel but help you understand your character: What’s her morning routine? Her shoe size? Her favorite team?”

5. If your mind is blank, then take a walk

“I’m a huge fan of going on walks. It’s like giving my brain recess. And I never go without a notebook and a pen in my pocket.”

6. Accept that this is difficult work

“Just accept that, at times during this process, you’re going to feel scared, you’re going to feel frustrated, you’re going to feel dumb. The best thing to do then is write and write and write.”

7. Writers write

“I get worried about talking about writing. It’s fun, but you need to do it. Sometimes talking about writing dilutes the idea.”

8. Don’t let rejection dissuade you

“I have the usual stack of rejection letters from publishers. I still get rejected.”

9. Every writer is different

“Everything I say, you should take with a grain of salt, because you can talk to another writer and they’ll tell you something different.”

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