01 18, 2020

Explore the Anne Frank House at Mentor Public Library

By |2020-01-18T06:00:18-05:00January 18, 2020|

Anne Frank

Anne Frank

In recognition of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, all are invited to explore the historic Anne Frank House.

You can use virtual reality to tour the secret rooms where Anne and her family hid during the Nazi occupation of Amsterdam during World War II.

From Jan. 20 to Feb. 1, any of our patrons can stop by the Children’s Desk in our Main Branch to sign up for a time slot. To be clear, this virtual tour is open to all, not just children.

Anne Frank was a young diarist who was born a German national but lost her citizenship because of her family’s Jewish heritage. Her family lived in fear and hiding for years until they were apprehended in 1944. All the while, teenaged Anne kept a diary of her experiences. Of course, you are also welcome to borrow Anne’s Diary of a Young Girl from your local library.

By the way, one of our librarians happens to have earned a doctorate in German history, and he has offered several lectures on the Shoah and World War II, including:

07 8, 2019

Akron during World War II

By |2019-07-08T06:00:10-04:00July 8, 2019|

Goodyear blimps had a very different role during World War II.

Goodyear blimps had a very different role during World War II.

The city of Akron, Ohio, had an outsized impact during World War II.

Its citizens served in Europe and the South Pacific. Goodyear built blimps that hunted Nazi submarines. And some of the city’s most renowned residents had a personal tie to the war.

Celebrated Beacon Journal artist Web Brown created cartoons that boosted morale. And Newspaper magnate John S. Knight lost a son in Germany. Five month later, he watched the Japanese surrender on the USS Missouri.

You can learn more about Akron’s role in World War II when author and historian Tim Carroll visits at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, July 22, at our Main Branch.

Carroll is an Akron native, and both of his grandfathers were drafted before Pearl Harbor. He wrote World War II Akron, which explains the city and its people’s role in the war. If you want to read the book before Carroll’s talk, you can borrow a copy from us or on Hoopla.

This program is free to attend and open to all. We only ask that you register beforehand. You can sign up online or call us at (440) 255-8811 ext. 247.

By the way, if you’re interested in history, we’ve hosted several programs and lectures about World War II — many of which you can watch online. This includes WWII veteran and Purple Heart recipient Bob Zonneville sharing his experiences from the front line.

Zonneville and local historian Thom Matowitz also spoke at the library to discuss what life was like for WWII veterans when they returned home.

Furthermore, our own Dr. John Foster — who, in addition to being a reference librarian, has a doctorate degree in history with a specialization in Modern German History — has given several lectures on WWII and the Holocaust that you can watch online.

Finally, we have hundreds — not an exaggeration — of books and documentaries about World War II that are free to borrow with your library card.

07 1, 2019

The Untold Stories of Mentor, Ohio, with Thomas Matowitz

By |2019-07-01T06:00:03-04:00July 1, 2019|

Thomas Matowitz, the author and local historian who literally wrote the book one Mentor, Ohio, returned to the library to share some of his best stories.

Matowitz is the perfect person to discuss prominent Mentor families like the Garfields, landmarks like the Wildwood Estate, and more. But he also has a mindful of spectacular Mentor stories that nearly nobody else knows, including:

  • Mentor’s only Congressional Medal of Honor recipient
  • the most fatal day in Mentor’s history
  • the tale of the WWII pilot from Mentor who is buried in Normandy.

For more from Matowitz:

Speaking of history, you can also join us for our 200th anniversary party at 6 p.m. on Friday, July 12, on our Main Branch lawn. Help make a community mosaic of Mentor with Gail Christofferson of Animal House Glass.

Also, Tom Todd, the Amazing One Man Band, will perform from 6 to 7 pm. Bring your lawn chairs or blankets, sit back and enjoy  a little bit of Jimmy Buffett. We will also have cake and contests. All are welcome and no registration is required for our party.

 

01 27, 2019

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: The Infamous Auschwitz

By |2019-01-27T06:00:14-05:00January 27, 2019|

Each year, our resident historian Dr. John Foster hosts a special program for International Holocaust Day.

In past years, he’s discussed the Nuremberg Trials, rise of National Socialism in Germanyand origins of the Nazi’s Final Solution.

This year, his topic was Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi Germany’s death camps. He discussed its grisly purpose, some of its most famous survivors, and the overwhelming evidence that it served as a death camp.

By the way, each year Foster gives a series of lectures about American history. His previous topics include the Battles of World War II and US Presidents of the 20th Century. This year, he’ll discuss the American Revolution.

The series begins at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 21, at our Main Branch. The topic is the origins of the Revolution.

Finally, if you’re interested, most of Foster’s previous historical talks can be viewed in their entirety on our YouTube channel.

01 5, 2019

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: Surviving Auschwitz

By |2019-01-05T06:00:51-05:00January 5, 2019|

Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi Germany's death camps, will be the subject of our annual International Holocaust Remembrance Day lecture.

Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi Germany’s death camps, will be the subject of our annual International Holocaust Remembrance Day lecture.

Each year, our resident historian Dr. John Foster hosts a special program for International Holocaust Day.

In past years, he’s discussed the Nuremberg Trials, rise of National Socialism in Germanyand origins of the Nazi’s Final Solution.

This year, his topic will be surviving Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi Germany’s death camps. The talk will be 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, at our Main Branch.

The program is open to all. We only request that you register beforehand. You can sign up online or call us at (440) 255-8811 ext. 247.

By the way, if you’re interested, most of Foster’s previous historical talks can be viewed in their entirety on our YouTube channel.

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