10 12, 2019

Meet Savanna, the short-eared owl, at our Headlands Branch

By |2019-10-12T06:00:53-04:00October 12, 2019|

Andy from Lake Metroparks introduces everyone to Savanna, a short-eared owl and one of the Metroparks' animal ambassadors.

Andy from Lake Metroparks introduces everyone to Savanna, a short-eared owl and one of the Metroparks’ animal ambassadors.

Families met one of Lake Metroparks’ animal ambassadors during a special program last week at our Headlands Branch.

Kids learned about Savanna, a short-eared owl, who now lives at Lake Metroparks Wildlife Center in Penitentiary Glen.

Trevor the Trapper shows the families a white-tailed deer pelt.

Trevor the Trapper shows the families a white-tailed deer pelt.

They also heard about what kinds of wild animals roamed Ohio in the 1800s, as part of our 200th anniversary celebration. Trevor the Trapper explained what animals (like the porcupine, mountain lion, American bison) used to roam Ohio but have since been extirpated — that is, to say, they are locally extinct.

There are dozens of animals that used to make Ohio their habitat but can now only be found in zoos or museums. They include mammals like the lynx, birds like the swallow-tailed kite, fish like the alligator gar, and the mustard white butterfly. And some like the passenger pigeon and blue pike are completely extinct.

You can visit the Ohio Department of Wildlife’s website for a complete list of Ohio endangered, extirpated, and extinct animals.

03 3, 2019

Learn about birding at Mentor Public Library

By |2019-03-03T06:00:21-05:00March 3, 2019|

Learn how and where you can start birding with the experts at Lake Metroparks.

Learn how and where you can start birding with the experts at Lake Metroparks.

Lake County is a boon to birdwatchers. Hundreds of bird species call the Mentor Marsh, Mentor Lagoons Nature Preserve, Chagrin River Park, Girdled Road Reservation, Penitentiary Glen Reservation, Hell Hollow Wilderness Area and Holden Arboretum home.

Learn how to find and identify the birds in your regions from the experts at Lake Metroparks during a special program at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19, at Mentor Public Library’s Main Branch. No previous experience required.

This program is free to attend and open to all. We only ask that you register beforehand. You can sign up online or call us at (440) 255-8811 ext. 247.

By the way, Lake Metroparks has both a blog and Facebook group for birders, if you’re interested.

We also have bunches of birding books that you can borrow, if you want.

02 5, 2019

Kids can go on a snowshoe adventure at our Lake Branch

By |2019-02-05T06:00:29-05:00February 5, 2019|

Kids can strap on snowshoes and have an adventure on Monday, Feb. 18, at our Lake Branch.

Kids can strap on snowshoes and have an adventure on Monday, Feb. 18, at our Lake Branch.

Want a cool adventure for kids when they’re off school for Presidents’ Day? How about snowshoeing?

Our friends from Lake Metroparks will teach kids (third through sixth graders) how to use snowshoes during a special program at 2 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 18, at our Lake Branch.

The program is free. We only ask that you register beforehand. You can sign up online or call us at the Lake Branch at (440) 257-2512.

A couple of notes for those who want to participate:

  • Make sure you wear boots and, in general, are dressed for winter weather. The Metroparks will provide snowshoes for the kids to use, but you still don’t want to show up in sneakers.
  • This program requires at least four inches of snow to work, so keep your fingers crossed. Feel free to call us to confirm if we got enough snow.

 

09 29, 2016

Meeting the nocturnal animals of Ohio

By |2016-09-29T07:02:04-04:00September 29, 2016|

Tim Cunningham from Lake Metroparks introduces us to Hemlock, a barred owl that lives in Penitentiary Glen.

Tim Cunningham from Lake Metroparks introduces us to Hemlock, a barred owl that lives in Penitentiary Glen.

Lake Metroparks introduced us to some of the nocturnal birds and mammals that live in the Kevin P. Clinton Wildlife Center at Penitentiary Glen.

The center receives and rehabilitates nearly 2,000 injured or orphaned animals each year. Those animals include rabbits, songbirds, opossums and more—even peregrine falcons and bald eagles. (However, they don’t take skunks and raccoons because they’re rabies threats or coyotes because they’re not originally from Ohio.) Most of their rescue animals eventually return to the wild.

However, some of their animals are too injured to return and they become animal ambassadors.

We were fortunate enough to meet some of their nocturnal animal ambassadors on Wednesday.

Dexter, an opossum, meets the group. Dexter came to Penitentiary Glen when his mother was hit by a car.

Dexter, an opossum, meets the group. Dexter came to Penitentiary Glen when his mother was hit by a car.

We met an opossum named Dexter, a screech owl named Rufus, and a barred owl named Hemlock.

We also learned some fun facts about each animals. For example, opossums are the only marsupial—that means they carry their young around in a pouch—in North America. Also, owls can turn their heads 270 degrees. That’s nearly all the way around!

Tim Cunningham from Lake Metroparks also explained what it takes to be a nocturnal animal that hunts (or avoids being hunted) at night.

Most nocturnal animals have more sensitive eyes, noses, ears or senses of touch than their diurnal counterparts.

For instance, an owl can spot its prey from the length of a football field.

Avery checks out the talon of a screech owl.

Avery checks out the talon of a screech owl.

We want to thank Lake Metroparks and all the families who came to our Nocturnal Animals program on Wednesday.

We hope you had as much fun as we did and learned something too!

Visit our Facebook page for more photos from the animals’ visit.

Santosh Akilesh and Diya show off the owl masks that they made at our program.

Santosh Akilesh and Diya show off the owl masks that they made at our program.

 

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