10 28, 2019

Support Broadmoor & Deepwood by donating craft supplies this November at Mentor Library

By |2019-10-28T06:00:41-04:00October 28, 2019|

You can support Deepwood and Broadmoor School by donating craft items at Mentor Public Library this November.

You can support Deepwood and Broadmoor School by donating craft items at Mentor Public Library this November.

We’re hosting donation drives all year as part of our 200th anniversary celebration.

This November, we’re collecting items for Broadmoor School and Lake County Board of DD/Deepwood. The mission of Deepwood is to EMPOWER people with developmental disabilities to ENGAGE in activities that ENRICH their lives and contribute to their community.

You can support Broadmoor, Deepwood, and its clients by donating items from its wish list at our Main, Lake and Headlands Branches, including:

  • Stickers (holiday or themed)
  • Foam stickers
  • Holiday craft kits for three to six year olds
  • Washable markers
  • Dry-erase markers
  • Play-Doh
  • Crayons
  • Stamp Pads
  • Coloring Books
  • Books that make noise like music or sound effects
  • Easel paper
  • Card stock paper (variety of colors)
  • Butcher block paper
  • Wrapping paper
  • Colored yissue paper
  • Colored Bingo stampers (variety of colors)
  • Glue gun sticks
  • Glue sticks
  • Crafting pompoms
  • Pencil boxes and pencil pouches
  • Colored balls
  • Silk flowers
  • Tempera paint (red, yellow, blue, green, purple, black and white) (pint, quart or gallon)
  • Christmas or any other holiday decorations
  • Jingle bells

These supplies will provide students at Broadmoor School and participants of all ages in Deepwood’s Recreation Program to engage in creative activities, enhancing fine motor skills, enriching their quality of lives, and empowering them to achieve their goals.

Visit the Lake County Board of DD/Deepwood’s website for more information on their many programs and services.

By the way, our Year of Giving concludes this December when we collect for Toys for Tots and our annual Can Your Fines Food Drive.

Thank you for giving if you can! And check here for more ways you can enjoy 200 years of Mentor Public Library.

10 5, 2016

Former Read House resident returns as library volunteer

By |2016-10-05T06:00:03-04:00October 5, 2016|

Doug Reed helps shelve books in the house where he used to live. The Read House is now owned by Mentor Public Library.

Doug Reed helps shelve books in the house where he used to live. The Read House is now owned by Mentor Public Library.

William “Doug” Reed walked through the rooms of the house where he lived for 55 years.

On Sundays, he would play records here—big band music—before going to Mentor Methodist Church across the street, he reminisced.

Mentor Public Library purchased the house in 2009 and renamed it the Read House, keeping the homonym to honor the Reed family.

The library, whose Main Branch is next door, uses the Read House backyard for outdoor programs—everything from campfire story times to summer reading parties.

On Monday, Oct. 3, Reed surveyed the rooms where bookshelves had replaced the familiar trappings of home.

What do you think of the changes, someone asked him.

“Not too bad,” Reed said.

He then saw a book about American presidents that interested him and began thumbing through the pages.

Sharon Link, another volunteer from Deepwood's Willoughby Branch, helps shelve the books  in MPL's Read House.

Sharon Link, another volunteer from Deepwood’s Willoughby Branch, helps shelve the books in MPL’s Read House.

Reed, now 72, returned to the Read House as part of a volunteer group from Lake County Board of Developmental Disabilities/Deepwood’s Willoughby Branch.

The Deepwood clients helped shelve books that are given away from MPL’s Pop-Up and Little Free Libraries and sold during the Friends of the Mentor Public Library’s book sales. The money raised from those sales supports library programming and special events.

Judy Tsiros, a community integration professional at Deepwood’s Willoughby Branch, helped organize the volunteering with Mentor Public Library.

“The value for volunteering is almost immeasurable,” Tsiros said. “It really connects people to the community, and it expands their self-worth.”

By serendipity, Reed was one of the volunteers. He’s an enthusiastic reader with a particular interest in presidential history and baseball. He’d often pause to read a cover while shelving.

When finished, he asked if he could keep a couple of books. The library allowed it. After all, he’d been gracious enough to help the library and to share his house.

Martin Andersen likes one of the books he finds while volunteering in the Read House.

Martin Andersen likes one of the books he finds while volunteering in the Read House.

For more information about volunteer opportunities at Mentor Public Library, visit our Volunteer page.

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