Learn how to trace your family’s history during a free program at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 6, at our Main Library.

Genealogy educator and writer Sunny Morton will provide an introduction to the popular – but very personal – pastime of discovering your family history. Learn why you’ll want to start with a purpose or question in mind. Discover where to look for answers and how to create simple charts to organize what you learn.

Morton’s talk is open to all. Due to limited space, registration is required. Sign up on our website or call us at 440-255-8811 ext. 1.

By the way, did you know that your library card gives you access to not one, not two, not three, but four different genealogy websites? For free.

They are:

  1. Ancestry — Search for your family’s history through censuses, cemeteries, city directories, military and immigration records, and more public records.
  2. Fold3 — Fold3 allows you to research your family’s military history going back to the Revolutionary War.
  3. HeritageQuest — Similar to our Ancestry database. Browse public records, including censuses that go back to the 18th Century, US Indian census rolls, mortality schedules and more.
  4. African-American Heritage — A genealogy database that specializes in African-American heritage, complete with state-by-state guides and a volunteer-staffed forum.

You don’t need to know much to get started on our databases—a name, somewhere that person lived and it helps to know his or her approximate birth year. And, frankly, if you don’t know your great-grandfather or great-great-mother’s birth year, it usually only takes a single search to find out.

These databases search through millions of public records: census and immigration information, birth/marriage/death certificates, and more. Not only can you view these documents, but you can email them to yourself and your family members.